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LSU All-American Tracker: Kade Scivicque, Alex Lange and Alex Bregman are Perfect Game All-Americans

Kade Scivicque nabbed another All-American honor. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

Kade Scivicque nabbed another All-American honor. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

The All-American Tracker gives you an easy way to track LSU players’ All-American honors for the 2015 season.

Updated through June 29

(bolded signifies the most recent awards)

RHP Alex Lange

  • 1st team, Perfect Game
  • 1st team freshman, D1Baseball.com
  • 1st team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 2nd team, D1Baseball
  • 1st team, NCBWA
  • 1st team, Baseball America
  • All-freshman team, Collegiate Baseball
  • All-freshman team, Baseball America
  • Freshman pitcher of the year, Collegiate Baseball
  • All-freshman team, NCBWA
  • Freshman pitcher of year, NCBWA

SS Alex Bregman

  • 1st team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 1st team, D1Baseball
  • 1st team, Baseball America
  • 2nd team, NCBWA
  • 2nd team, Perfect Game

C Kade Scivicque

  • 2nd team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 1st team, D1Baseball
  • 2nd team, Baseball America
  • 3rd team, NCBWA
  • 3rd team, Perfect Game

1B Chris Chinea

  • 3rd team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 3rd team, NCBWA

RHP Jesse Stallings

  • All-freshman team, Collegiate Baseball
  • All-freshman team, NCBWA

OF Andrew Stevenson

  • 3rd team, D1Baseball
  • 3rd team, Baseball America

LSU All-American Tracker: Alex Lange lands on D1Baseball’s first team

Alex Lange is 11-0. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

Alex Lange is 11-0. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

The All-American Tracker gives you an easy way to track LSU players’ All-American honors for the 2015 season.

Updated through June 29

(bolded signifies the most recent awards)

RHP Alex Lange

  • 1st team freshman, D1Baseball.com
  • 1st team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 2nd team, D1Baseball
  • 1st team, NCBWA
  • 1st team, Baseball America
  • All-freshman team, Collegiate Baseball
  • All-freshman team, Baseball America
  • Freshman pitcher of the year, Collegiate Baseball
  • All-freshman team, NCBWA
  • Freshman pitcher of year, NCBWA

SS Alex Bregman

  • 1st team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 1st team, D1Baseball
  • 1st team, Baseball America
  • 2nd team, NCBWA

C Kade Scivicque

  • 2nd team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 1st team, D1Baseball
  • 2nd team, Baseball America
  • 3rd team, NCBWA

1B Chris Chinea

  • 3rd team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 3rd team, NCBWA

RHP Jesse Stallings

  • All-freshman team, Collegiate Baseball
  • All-freshman team, NCBWA

OF Andrew Stevenson

  • 3rd team, D1Baseball
  • 3rd team, Baseball America

Part II, Q and A with LSU coach Paul Mainieri: Looks to 2016 as Tigers must replace a bevy of position players

(HILARY SCHEINUK )

(HILARY SCHEINUK )

How will LSU replace All-American shortstop Alex Bregman? Who fills the holes left by speedy outfielders Andrew Stevenson and Mark Laird?

In Part II of a Q&A with Paul Mainieri, the coach provides some insight to a massive rebuilding process he’ll undertake ahead of the 2016 season. Part I of the Q&A can be found here.

LSU loses seven position players from a squad that advanced to the College World Series and finished with the nation’s best record at 54-12. As many as four freshmen could be in the opening day starting lineup next season and a couple more junior college signees are poised to start as well.

Meanwhile, the new baseball isn’t changing Mainieri’s recruiting method – he’ll continue to focus his efforts on power pitchers.

Q: Alex Bregman. How do you replace him? Who are the guys you could see playing that position next year?

Mainieri: First of all, what an eight-year run this has been for me as the coach at LSU. The last eight years, we’ve had a shortstop by the name of DJ LeMahieu, Austin Nola or Alex Bregman. Three bonafide major leaguers. That’s a great run that we had, and I hope it would continue.

When Alex Bregman came here as a freshman, we didn’t know he was going to be that caliber of a shortstop. A lot of people thought catcher was the position he should play. In fact, the summer before he came to school here, he wasn’t even playing shortstop. He was catching. Only because I encouraged him to take groundballs every day and that I wanted to look at him at short first that he prepare himself to try to be the shortstop here.

You never know how it’s exactly going to work out. You just don’t know.

AleBregman. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

AleBregman. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

DJ LeMahieu, we sweated out him signing professionally until the day he showed up for school in August. Austin Nola I sweated out a little bit whether or not he would sign, though I had a good feeling. So at this point in the summer it’s rare to say, ‘This guy is going to be your shortstop and this is how good he’s going to be,’ because you just don’t know.

We were pretty surprised this junior college shortstop, Mitch Piatnik, signed professionally for $200,000. That was not the indication he had given to us of what his desires were. The opportunity to replace Alex Bregman at shortstop is also a great responsibility and how a player looks at that can be different from one player to another. Some players might be afraid of that. Others may embrace that opportunity. When I talk to (signee) Trey Dawson about the possibility of him replacing Alex Bregman, he’s excited about that. He’s not afraid. He turned down $650,000 signing bonus. Somebody would have taken him in the third round if he would have just said, ‘yes, I’ll sign for that amount.’

That in itself doesn’t tell you the guy’s going to be a great player, but obviously somebody thought highly of him. Several teams did at that point in the draft. I feel fortunate that Trey is coming to school. He’s a good athlete. Now, how does he handle it every day? Who knows. But I have a good feeling about him. Let me just put it that way.

We’re also going to look at O’Neal Lochridge, who played shortstop for St. Thomas More. In my mind, I had always thought of O’Neal more as a third baseman than a shortstop but, especially after Piatnik leaving, I think we have to do our due diligence and take a look at him at shortstop first. Regardless of whether O’Neal stays at short or slides over at third, both of those positions are going to be critical for us to replace. I’m not sure how the pieces of the puzzle will fit together at this point.

And then you have Grayson Byrd and Kramer Robertson who are returning from last year’s team will be right there in the mix.

Q: How do other returning guys fit in to replace seven of eight position players lost this season?

Mainieri: Of all the returning backup players, the guy that probably gives me the strongest feeling that he’s ready to play for us and play at a high level at least for the portion of the time is Michael Papierski behind the plate. I think he’s an excellent defensive catcher. Now, his hitting needs to improve by leaps and bounds. And I’m really excited about Jordan Romero, the LSU-Eunice catcher from Catholic High coming as well.

I think Bryce Jordan has made a lot of improvement, even though you haven’t seen it because it’s been mostly catching pitchers in the bullpen. I think between those three guys we’re going to have a nice core of catchers. I think of all of the returning backup players Michael Papierski shows he’s probably the most ready because it’s such a critical defensive position.

Next I think you’ve got to look at Kramer Robertson because I think he can play defense. Will he be a good enough offensive player? Has he matured in his knowledge of the game enough that he can be an instinctive player. He’s off to a good start in the Cape Cod League. Got three hits in his first game. He’ll be in the mix there.

Danny Zardon will be a third-year bat. I’m still concerned about where we play him defensively and he may just be a first baseman or a DH. I don’t know. Maybe an emergency infielder. I think the Jordan boys showed glimpses. I was extremely high on those boys last fall. When they didn’t get a chance to play regularly in the spring, they didn’t perform as well, but after playing this summer I’m hoping they’ll return to what they showed during fall practice and continue that when they get back here.

I think Grayson (Byrd) has made enormous improvements from the fall to the spring. Now, whether or not he improves enough that would warrant him to be an everyday player, time will tell.

Greg Deichmann. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

Greg Deichmann. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

I think Greg Deichmann still has a lot of room for improvement. I’m trying to figure out where defensively he can play in a positive way. And will he hit consistently enough? His first 22 games of the Northwoods League has been kind of a mixed bag. I don’t think he’s hitting .200 right now after 100 at-bats and no home runs and striking out one out one of every three at-bats. He’s not off to a great start there. Hopefully it will get better.

Q: You have two outfield spots to fill, too, right?

Mainieri: Beau (Jordan) is an outfielder, but Beau’s not a speed demon out there either. It was nice having some fast guys. We’ve got some good freshmen coming in and junior college transfers coming in. Cody Ducote is a kid I’m excited about seeing. He was the best hitter at Delgado for the last two years. His coaches made comparisons to Sean McMullen and Mason Katz to me. If he can hit like either one of those guys consistently, he’s going to have a good chance to play here.

The two kids out of Lafayette, I’m extremely excited about – Brennan Breaux, who follows in Andrew Stevenson’s footsteps as the center fielder from St. Thomas More, and Antoine Duplantis is a player that I’ve really taken a liking to. He can run. He can hit. His brother just finished his career here as a pole vaulter on our track team. His mom and dad were track athletes at LSU as well. So he comes from a family of signifianct athletic ability and he can run. He’s kind of cut out of the same mold as Laird and Stevenson. I think he’s going to be a pretty good hitter too.

Breaux and Duplantis, I think, have a chance. There’s a kid from Georgia we recruited named Brody Wofford that we think is going to be a pretty good hitter. We’re not sure he’s going to be a corner infielder or corner outfielder yet. We’ll kind of let the process happen throughout the fall. It’s hard to say of the returning players which ones have the inside track on playing because we’ve got all of these new guys coming.

Kid named Cole Freeman, a second baseman from Delgado, can really run. He hit real well at Delgado this year. Is he going to be better than Kramer? We’re going to line them up and see. Bryce Adams, a kid out of Dunham who went to Delgado. He’s a big, strong home-run hitting first baseman.

Q: Your opening day starting lineup in 2016 could include five true freshmen?

Mainieri: I think so. Three to four maybe. Five might be an extension.

Q: Does that scare you – going from such a veteran lineup to that?

Mainieri: I don’t know if scare is the right word. I think it’s exciting. I’ve played freshmen before. In 2013, we went to Omaha with three freshmen in our starting lineup. Laird, Stevenson and Bregman. My first year here we played four freshmen every day.

Some freshman, just like in pitching, will adapt quicker than others.

Q: The new ball. Have you seen enough from it this year to change anything you do as a coach or a recruiter?

Mainieri: I think the ball helped a little bit. I thought it helped about the level I thought it would – maybe 25 percent better. I don’t think you can build a team just based on hitting home runs. I don’t think you want to anyway if you want to win in Omaha. I’m glad to see a little bit more life into the ball, which translates into a little bit more offense, but I think there’s more they could do. Wish we would go to the minor league ball. Has a different core. Wish bats were a little more lively, but they’re not so you just deal with it.

Alex Lange is 11-0. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

Alex Lange. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

There’s no question … UCLA showed the model back in 2013. They hit .240 as a team and won the national championship because they dominated on the mound. You just don’t see teams winning anymore unless they dominate on the mound. That’s what we’re going to continue to try to do.

We need Alex Lange to pitch at the high level like he did this year. I hope somebody will develop enough to pass Jared Poché in the rotation. If we had a rotation of Lange and another super stud dominating guy and Jared Poché was your third-best starter, that’d be a pretty good staff.

Q: Lange. It’s tough to follow a freshman season like that, but what do you expect from him?

Mainieri: It is really scary. Aaron Nola had a season like this his sophomore year and I remember going into his junior year and the draft was lurking and everything else and I told Aaron, ‘Look, don’t worry about matching the numbers of last season. Just go out there every day and do the best you can and work hard with (Alan Dunn), prepare and pitch to win. Just try to help your team win.’

It worked well for him. He just kept his focus on being a team oriented guy and he had a tremendous year as a junior following a phenomenal sophomore year. I’ll probably give Alex the same advice, but Alex is a very similar kid to Aaron Nola. They’re very humble, very hard-working, very respectful, very team-oriented. So I really don’t see an issue with Alex Lange at all. I don’t think he’ll put any added pressure on him. I think he’s just going to go out there and try to be the best teammate he can.

Part I, Q and A with LSU coach Paul Mainieri: Evaluating the 2015 season and detailing team’s limitations

Skip Bertman and Paul Mainieri at the CWS. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

Skip Bertman and Paul Mainieri at the CWS. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

His ninth season as LSU’s head baseball coach a few days behind him, Paul Mainieri sat down with The Advocate to discuss one of the best regular seasons in program history and a postseason that ended just a couple of games short of the national championship series.

The Tigers finished with the nation’s best record at 54-12, won the Southeastern Conference regular season title and advanced to a 17th College World Series. His team didn’t underachieve, but they did fall short of winning the school’s seventh national title, Mainieri said. That means his expectations were not met.

He detailed his squad’s ultimate undoing – not having a third starting pitcher and enough power arms. He explained how he and his staff are combating the lack of power pitchers and why some schools are able to get power arms easier.

Mainieri suggested that rising sophomores Austin Bain, Jake Godfrey and Doug Norman have potential to be starters, but that they need more experience in the summer and fall, specifically with secondary pitchers.

Part II of our Q&A will be released online Friday. In that, Mainieri details how he might replace seven position starters, including shortstop Alex Bregman, and what he expects from ace Alex Lange in Year 2 in Baton Rouge.

Q: Did this season live up to your expectations?

Mainieri: That’s a tricky question because every year my expectations are to win a national championship. That’s what we go into the season to do. With that said, that’s only happened six times in the illustrious history of LSU baseball.

The absolute, only way you evaluate a season living up to your expectations is if you won the last game of the season and held up the big trophy. About 99.9 percent of the time you’re going to be disappointed and have to say that it didn’t live up to expectations.

I think when you take a step back and think about going into the season what our feelings were … we did say we had a very veteran lineup. We expected to have more underclassmen in the lineup. (Danny) Zardon, Kramer Robertson. As it turns out, (Chris) Sciambra and (Jared) Foster became every day players and replaced those two guys. There were other twists and turns that made that happen so we ended up with an extremely veteran lineup but we still went into it with a very young pitching staff. When you’re counting on an extremely young, freshman oriented pitching staff, that could be disastrous or it could turn out OK. You don’t really know for sure.

Jake Godfrey. (PATRICK DENNIS)

Jake Godfrey. (PATRICK DENNIS)

If all of the freshmen had pitched like Jake Godfrey, Austin Bain, Doug Norman, then it would have been a mediocre season because those guys had great moments but they had poor moments as well. If all of them had happened like what happened to Jake Latz and Mac Marshall, it would have been a disaster because those guys didn’t pitch for us. Fortunately for us we had one freshman by the name of Alex Lange that far surpassed anybody’s expectations. You can’t expect anybody, much less a true freshman, to go 12-0 with a sub-2 ERA. That’s Aaron Nola as a junior, pitching at that level. Who can expect something like that?

When you add it all together, knowing that you had so many questions with the pitching going in, couple of changes in the lineup … you look at it and say we won an SEC championship, we were a national seed for a fourth straight year, won more games than anybody in the country, swept a regional, swept a super regional after hosting both events. You go to Omaha. You don’t win the national championship but you won a game. Basically finished in the top five in the country. That’s not a bad season. It’s a little bit difficult to say it met your expectations or it didn’t meet your expectations.

I don’t think we underachieved. I don’t think we had a disastrous season at all. I’m very proud of the kids and what they accomplished but, obviously, unless you win the last game of the season you’re never truly satisfied.

Q: You mentioned after the season-ending loss that limitations on your club were exposed. When you look at those limitations and what happened this season, do you change anything about your coaching or recruiting moving forward?

Mainieri: Every team has limitations. Virtually every team. Vanderbilt, it’s kind of hard to find many weaknesses on their team. Most teams have imperfections. I’ve been to Omaha five times – once with Notre Dame and four times with LSU. One time we won it all and one time we went 2 and out. The other three times we lost to the same team both times. We lost to that team, then won a game and then lost to that team again.

You see this happen frequently. So sometimes I think you get to that tournament and the matchup of the team you play just seems to have your number for whatever reason. I’m not saying that it’s the strength of their team exposes the limitations of your team. It’s hard to say what the reasons are. Maybe it’s just the format of the tournament, but it seems so frequently. TCU lost to Vanderbilt twice. To us, TCU looked so great but then Vanderbilt whips them 7-1 the next day.

It’s a strange phenomena that happens out there. Sometimes it’s what bracket you end up in. When we won in 09, Arkansas lost to us twice.

I think any season, whatever level you play at, it’s incumbent that you evaluate yourself. When I say yourself, I mean us as coaches. I’m talking about our program. You do a self-evaluation and say, ‘How can we do business better?’

There are some things I think we have to do better. Offensively, I think we need to be more productive when we have a runner at third base with less than two outs. We became a very aggressive team this year. Much more of a free-swinging team, hunt fastballs, hit home runs, hit extra-base hits, hit for a high average, got a lot of hits. But it was also, in the last six or seven years, probably the poorest team we had in scoring runners from third base with less than two outs. Maybe that’s because the pitchers pitch us differently when there’s a runner at third base. Now all of the sudden, they’re throwing off-speed pitches in fastball counts and that type of thing and we need to adjust to that better.

We stole a lot more bases. That’s a positive thing. But we also had some poor base-running reactions to situations because our mindset was so much in stealing bases that we didn’t react to batted balls sometimes the way I think we should have.

I think we need to bunt for hits more frequently, and I think it would be good for us to draw a few more walks.

I think our pitchers need to field their position better. We need to spend more time working with them on having them field their position better. I think we need to hold runners a little bit better.

One thing that’s shown from this tournament is the teams that win are the teams that dominate on the mound. Alex Lange dominates on the mound, we win. Jared Poché did not dominate on the mound and the guys we used in Game 3 did not dominate on the mound. We’re constantly striving to find those kinds of pitchers that are capable of going out there and pitching seven innings for you in a dominating fashion.

We thought we had one in Mac Marshall. We thought we potentially had one in Jake Latz. I think Jake Godfrey, Doug Norman, Austin Bain are perhaps capable of being dominating, but they’re not quite there yet because they were true freshmen that need more time for development.

This summer will help in their development. This fall will help. We’ll see if next year we have somebody that becomes more dominant because of the stuff that they have and their ability to execute their pitchers.

I don’t know if it means you recruit differently. I think you evaluate everything that you do and you try to improve. In order to improve, that’s also assuming that everything you already have is in place and you’re just improving upon what you already have.

The truth of the matter is we’re losing eight of our nine everyday players. So just to build a team that can play defense at that level, hit at that level, steal bases at that level is still going to be a challenge. So before you can improve on those other things you still have to have that foundation. This is the nature of college sports. Every year you have such turnover that you have to start virtually from scratch to build your team and make those improvements.

(HILARY SCHEINUK)

(HILARY SCHEINUK)

Q: Your bullpen. You see Vanderbilt and other teams throw these guys out of the pen, and one after another are throwing 96 miles per hour. I hate to sound blunt, but why don’t we see that at LSU?

Mainieri: That’s a really tough question to answer. Circumstances are different at every university that allow certain caliber players to be recruited. It’s not a normal thing for a player to turn down $2 million signing bonuses to attend LSU. But that happens pretty regularly at Vanderbilt. Anybody could speculate to what those reasons are. I’m not going to sit here and say anything. Whatever I say sounds like excuses, and I’m not going to make excuses.

It is what it is. We deal with the circumstances. Some schools have certain things they’re able to do that others are not. Nothing is necessarily equal across the board. You think it is. You think everybody just has 11.7 scholarships, but that’s not exactly the way it is all of the time.

Q: What do you do as a coach to combat that?

Mainieri: I think we are. We finished in the top five in the country. We won more games than anybody in the country. But, no, we don’t have a dozen guys throwing 95 miles an hour like they (Vanderbilt) do. I’ll be the first two admit that. And it’s not like their position players are a bunch of slouches either. They’ve kind of become the standard, but it’s hard to equal that standard when you’re trying to put together a team on 11.7 scholarships to have that same caliber of guy. It’s just very difficult to do. But we’re doing pretty well I think.

Who knows what would have happened if Marshall would have stayed in school and Latz would have been healthy? Maybe we would have successfully combated that. We have a plan. It’s hard for me to sit here and tell you the intricate details of how we recruit. ‘Well, we’re going to give this player this percentage (of a scholarship) and this player this percentage and emphasize this over this.’ I’d be divulging private information about scholarships for individual players.

This is not something you have to even investigate when you’re covering football or basketball because every kid is on a full scholarship. In baseball, it’s not like that. You have to break it up. Some of our best players don’t receive any scholarship at all. What am I going to sit here and do? Tell you that we have to recruit this player for no money so that we have enough money to be able to get this great arm over here. I can’t get that specific with you. But we’re doing the best we can with it, and I think we’re doing pretty well.

I think we had a good team. We didn’t quite match up arms wise with a couple of the teams that finished above us. We’re doing pretty well. We’re fortunate that some of the players we did have came to school. We’re fortunate Lange came to school. We’re fortunate Alex Bregman came to school. Those were as good as anybody. It’s hard to do that on a consistent basis when players are having to …

Let me ask you this: I’m recruiting you. You come from a middle class family. You’re not a 4.0 student with 1400 on your SATs. Your parents aren’t both doctors. I offer you a 50 percent scholarship, which means you have to pay $20,000 to come to LSU. And then some pro team says, ‘If you’ll sign for $1 million, we’ll draft you.’

The market of kids that, for the most part, we’re recruiting for LSU usually take that opportunity to go into professional baseball. The market the Vanderbilt people are recruiting and what they can do for them, to off-set their costs, those kids sometimes turn down a couple of million dollars to go to school. And then you have the 95 miles per hour arm on your pitching staff. A dozen of them. They’ve got a dozen guys that throw 94-95 miles an hour.

There are guys on that staff that you don’t even know who they are and they throw 97-98 miles an hour.

Q: Can anybody in the nation match what Vanderbilt has in regard to the amount of high-velocity pitching? Maybe TCU?

Mainieri: TCU. Private school. A lot of the similar stuff. And then some schools come from states – like Florida, Texas A&M – that are so populated that the more players there (give you) a better chance. With all due respect, we get a lot of good players from the state of Louisiana but the Aaron Nolas of the world don’t grow on trees in the state because the state isn’t as populated. It doesn’t have as many players.

Austin Bain. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

Austin Bain. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

Q: The three freshmen you gave the opportunity to start – Godfrey, Norman, Bain – and it didn’t work out. Why do you think they didn’t work out?

Mainieri: I think it’s the experience level. Sometimes it’s experience. Sometimes it’s the mental makeup of the player. Sometimes it’s where he is on the development of his secondary pitches. Usually what we see is a significant amount of improvement between their first year and their second year.

They’re all going off to pitch this summer, all going off to pitch. All of the things we work with them, that Alan Dunn has worked with them on, they need to go apply this summer in somewhat of a less pressurized situation where they can pitch through those jams they might get in and continue to throw those pitches they may not throw because they have to win at LSU and they’re not going to throw their third-best pitch at a critical time of the game when we might lose a game to an SEC opponent if they do it. Whereas in the summer, they have more luxury to do those types of things.

It’s very unusual to have an Alex Lange as a true freshman. Aaron Nola wasn’t that good as a true freshman.

Poll Speak Final: LSU top five in final polls

Chris Sciambra rounds first base after his game-winning homer against Louisiana-Lafayette (AP).

Chris Sciambra rounds first base after his game-winning homer against Louisiana-Lafayette (AP).

Keep track of LSU’s final rankings as the polls are released.

Polls

  • Baseball America: ?

RPI

  • NCAA RPI: ?

LSU All-American Tracker: Alex Lange lands on BA’s All-freshman team

Alex Lange is 11-0. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

Alex Lange is 11-0. (HILARY SCHEINUK)

The All-American Tracker gives you an easy way to track LSU players’ All-American honors for the 2015 season.

Updated through June 24

(bolded signifies the most recent awards)

RHP Alex Lange

  • 1st team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 2nd team, D1Baseball
  • 1st team, NCBWA
  • 1st team, Baseball America
  • All-freshman team, Collegiate Baseball
  • All-freshman team, Baseball America
  • Freshman pitcher of the year, Collegiate Baseball
  • All-freshman team, NCBWA
  • Freshman pitcher of year, NCBWA

SS Alex Bregman

  • 1st team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 1st team, D1Baseball
  • 1st team, Baseball America
  • 2nd team, NCBWA

C Kade Scivicque

  • 2nd team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 1st team, D1Baseball
  • 2nd team, Baseball America
  • 3rd team, NCBWA

1B Chris Chinea

  • 3rd team, Collegiate Baseball
  • 3rd team, NCBWA

RHP Jesse Stallings

  • All-freshman team, Collegiate Baseball
  • All-freshman team, NCBWA

OF Andrew Stevenson

  • 3rd team, D1Baseball
  • 3rd team, Baseball America

Pregame: LSU vs. TCU (CWS)

IMG_4824

Lineups will be added to this post when they are released. 

General Info

  • What: LSU (54-11) vs. TCU (50-14)
  • When: 7 p.m. Thursday
  • Where: TD Ameritrade Park, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Starting pitchers: LSU Sr. LHP Zac Person (2-0, 3.34 ERA) vs. TCU So. RHP Mitchell Traver (9-2, 1.60)
  • TV: ESPN
  • Online: ESPN3.com
  • In-game updates on Twitter: @DellengerAdv,@RabalaisAdv
  • CWS (click to enlarge):

cws

 

Lineups

LSU

  • Alex Bregman, SS
  • Jake Fraley, LF
  • Kade Scivicque, C
  • Conner Hale, 3B
  • Chris Sciambra, DH
  • Andrew Stevenson, CF
  • Chris Chinea, 1B
  • Mark Laird, RF
  • Jared Foster, 2B

TCU

  • Cody Jones, CF
  • Jeremie Fagan, 1B
  • Connor Wanhanen, DH
  • Evan Skoug, C
  • Dane Steinhagen, LF
  • Derek Odell, 3B
  • Keaton Jones, SS
  • Nolan Brown, RF
  • Garrett Crain, 2B

Pregame: LSU vs. Cal State Fullerton (CWS)

CHo4QopXAAAhtcz

General Info

  • What: LSU (53-11) vs. Cal State Fullerton ( 39-24)
  • When: 2 p.m. Tuesday
  • Where: TD Ameritrade Park, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Starting pitchers: Fr. RHP Alex Lange (11-0, 1.89 ERA) vs. Fr. RHP Connor Seabold (5-3, 2.84)
  • TV: ESPN2
  • Online: ESPN3.com
  • In-game updates on Twitter: @DellengerAdv,@RabalaisAdv
  • CWS (click to enlarge):

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LSU

  • Alex Bregman, SS
  • Jake Fraley, LF
  • Kade Scivicque, C
  • Conner Hale, 3B
  • Chris Sciambra, DH
  • Andrew Stevenson, CF
  • Chris Chinea, 1B
  • Mark Laird, RF
  • Jared Foster, 2B

Cal State Fullerton

  • Josh Vargas, LF
  • Tyler Stieb, CF
  • Davi Olmedo-Barrera, DH
  • Jerrod Bravo, 3B
  • Tanner Pinkston, 1B
  • Dalton Blaser, RF
  • Timmy Richards, SS
  • A.J. Kennedy, C
  • Taylor Bryant, 2B

LSU, Cal State Fullerton set for CWS elimination game Tuesday

Paul Mainieri addressed reporters Monday. (Hilary Scheinuk)

Paul Mainieri addressed reporters Monday before LSU’s practice. (Hilary Scheinuk)

OMAHA , Neb. – LSU will meet Cal State Fullerton in an elimination game at 2 p.m. Tuesday in the College World Series.

The Titans lost 4-3 to Vanderbilt in a game that resumed Monday afternoon. Vandy’s Jeren Kendall hit a game-winning, two-run homer in the bottom of the ninth to lift the Dores to the victory.

Cal State Fullerton (39-24) led 3-1 entering the inning and had a 3-0 lead before thunderstorms postponed the game Sunday night. The Titans, who beat No. 3 national seed Louisville to get here, burned starter Thomas Eshelman in the win.

Fullerton’s No. 2 pitcher this season, Justin Garza (4-3, 3.05), is out with an injury. He was a preseason All-American. The Titans will start freshman right-handed pitcher Connor Seabold (5-3, 2.84) against freshman Alex Lange (11-0, 1.89).

LSU and CSF have met 10 times – the last one coming in 2011. The Tigers (53-11) are 6-4 in the series. LSU will be the visiting team Tuesday.

CWS coverage Sunday:

Pregame Blog: LSU vs. TCU (CWS)

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General Info

  • What: LSU (53-10) vs. TCU (49-13)
  • When: 2 p.m. Sunday
  • Where: TD Ameritrade Park, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Starting pitchers: So. LHP Jared Poché (9-1. 2.91) vs. Sr. RHP Preston Morrison (11-3, 2.55)
  • TV: ESPN
  • Online: ESPN3.com
  • In-game updates on Twitter: @DellengerAdv,@RabalaisAdv
  • CWS (click to enlarge):

CWS

Lineups

LSU

  • Mark Laird, RF
  • Jake Fraley, LF
  • Alex Bregman, SS
  • Kade Scivicque, C
  • Conner Hale, 3B
  • Andrew Stevenson, CF
  • Chris Chinea, 1B
  • Chris Sciambra, DH
  • Jared Foster, 2B

TCU

  • Cody Jones, CF
  • Jeremie Fagan, 1B
  • Connor Wanhanen, DH
  • Evan Skoug, C
  • Dane Steinhagen, LF
  • Derek Odell, 3B
  • Keaton Jones, SS
  • Nolan Brown, RF
  • Garrett Crain, 2B