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Louisiana legislators back idea of Pistol Pete statute

When thousands of Louisiana 50-somethings were teenagers the fashion was floppy hair and droopy socks, primarily because of Pistol Pete Maravich, the basketball phenom of their youth.

Last week, Louisiana legislators, a body full of 50-somethings, touched on those memories in passing a resolution asking the LSU Board of Supervisors to erect a statute memorializing the basketball icon outside the domed stadium on the LSU Baton Rouge campus that bears his name.

Pistol Pete Maravich’s widow, Jackie McLachlan, watches as Louisiana Senate President John Alario, R-Westwego, and House Speaker Chuck Kleckley, R-Lake Charles, sign a resolution asking the LSU Board of Supervisors to consider erecting a statue memorializing the basketball icon on the Baton Rouge campus.

Pistol Pete Maravich’s widow, Jackie McLachlan, watches as Louisiana Senate President John Alario, R-Westwego, and House Speaker Chuck Kleckley, R-Lake Charles, sign a resolution asking the LSU Board of Supervisors to consider erecting a statue memorializing the basketball icon on the Baton Rouge campus.

The resolution was passed without a single “no” vote.

Maravich still ranks as the leading NCAA Division I scorer with 3,667 points.  He played at the old basketball arena in what is now the John M. Parker Agricultural Center and his popularity helped raise the profile of LSU basketball.

He then played for the New Orleans Jazz in the late 1970s, before the National Basketball Association franchise moved to Utah in 1980.

About this time last year, after the statute idea percolated into public, LSU has a process for placing statues and memorials around the campus, and the administration wanted the regular procedures followed. Gov. Bobby Jindal then wrote LSU board members, many of whom he appointed and are his staunchest supporters, to consider erecting a statute, but offered no suggestions on how the project would be funded.

 

Successful U.S. Senate campaign of Bill Cassidy, R-La., agrees to pay $4,000 fine for financial disclosure violation

Washington — The successful 2014 U.S. Senate campaign of Bill Cassidy in Louisiana has agreed to pay a $4,000 fine for violating  federal disclosure rules.

Cassidy, then a Republican congressman from Baton Rouge, defeated incumbent Democrat Mary Landrieu in the Dec. 6 runoff.

The violation involved the failure to report $162,160 in campaign disbursements by the relevant filing deadline in August, the Federal Election Commission said in its settlement agreement. The campaign included the amount in an amended filing in October.

Cassidy campaign committee treasurer Ralph Stephens said Friday that the money had come to the campaign via a wire transfer, instead of through more routine methods, and it was overlooked in preparing the August report. A later reconciliation of accounts disclosed the omission, leading the campaign to file the amended report, he said.

Cassidy reported spending of $14.7 million on his campaign in all.

 

The Rundown: May 29, 2015

Louisiana Legislature Bobby Jindal The Advocate

Today in The Rundown: Bobby Jindal cancels an out-of-state appearance; Legislature kills equal pay talk; Southern University narrows its search for a new leader; and more.

Welcome to The Rundown, your guide to what’s happening in the Louisiana Legislature and go-to source for news about Louisiana politics and Gov. Bobby Jindal, brought to you by The Advocate.

Get The Rundown in your inbox by filling out the form here.

Countdown…
Days until session ends: 13
Days until the 2015 primary election day: 147
Days until the runoff (as needed): 175

Where in the world is Gov. Bobby Jindal? He is apparently not in New Hampshire. Per WUMR, Jindal was supposed to be there today as a guest on the Belknap County Republican Committee’s annual cruise of Lake Winnipesaukee, but he recently cancelled. http://bit.ly/1Hz7vk4

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Bill Cassidy, the seersucker senator

Washington – In both House and Senate, Republican Bill Cassidy has worked to shield his fellow Louisianians from the impact of federal regulations for flood insurance and flood protection.

In both chambers, he has supported completion of the Keystone XL pipeline from the oil-bearing tar sands of Canada to refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast.

Cassidy, who represented Baton Rouge in the House before winning election to the Senate last year, also has sustained interest in another cause since he moved across the U.S. Capitol rotunda: seersucker.

Cassidy’s office has announced June 11 as National Seersucker Day, and he has invited his fellow seersucker-wearing senators to join him for a group photo in the Capitol that day.

Cassidy revived the lapsed congressional tradition of saluting seersucker while in the House last year.

 

Poll: 5 candidates top GOP 2016 field, Bobby Jindal isn’t one of them

Five likely GOP presidential candidates grabbed double-digits in the latest Quinnipiac University National poll released today. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal isn’t one of them.

bobby jindal quinnipiac may poll

Gov. Bobby Jindal

Among likely Republican voters, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, neurosurgeon Ben Carson, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker each polled at 10 percent, the independent poll found.

Coming up behind them: U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky at 7 percent, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas at 6 percent, Donald Trump at 5 percent, New Jersey Gov. Christopher Christie at 4 percent and Carly Fiorina and Ohio Gov. John Kasich at 2 percent each.

Jindal, meanwhile, polled at 1 percent — the same as last month’s poll but down slightly from earlier this year, when he hit 3 percent.

Jindal announced an exploratory committee for a presidential run earlier this month. He’s expected to announce his 2016 intentions next month. His exploratory committee has scheduled a fundraiser and a reception for June 27.

Quinnipiac pollsters say the split among the top tier candidates — as well as the 20 percent who remain undecided — means that the race for the GOP’s 2016 nomination is still wide open.

“Safe to say, the 2016 Republican presidential primary is anyone’s race. With no front- runner and identical numbers for the top five contenders, it’s a horserace which can only be described as a scrambled field – at least so far,” Tim Malloy, assistant director of the poll, said in a news release.

Read the full poll, which also tested the Democratic field, here. 

The Quinnipiac poll surveyed 1,711 registered voters by phone May 19-26 (landlines and cellphones). The overall margin of error of 2.4 points, but the margin of error for Republican voters is 3.8 points,

The Rundown: May 28, 2015

Louisiana Legislature Bobby Jindal The Advocate

Today in The Rundown: Gov. Bobby Jindal goes after Rand Paul, a Common Core compromise moves forward, Republicans setting up potential for Medicaid expansion after Jindal leaves office, and much more.

Welcome to The Rundown, your guide to what’s happening in the Louisiana Legislature and go-to source for news about Louisiana politics and Gov. Bobby Jindal, brought to you by The Advocate.

Get The Rundown in your inbox by filling out the form here.

Countdown…
Days until session ends: 14
Days until the 2015 primary election day: 148
Days until the runoff (as needed): 176

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Bobby Jindal: Rand Paul ‘unsuited’ to be president; Democrats claim improper use of state office

Louisiana Democrats claim Gov. Bobby Jindal’s use of the governor’s office to take aim at Republican U.S. Sen. Rand Paul’s campaign for president is a “flagrant abuse of power and violation of the law.”

In a statement released by the Louisiana governor’s office, Jindal said Paul’s comments make him “unsuited to be Commander-in-Chief.”

Paul launched his 2016 presidential campaign last month.

State law prohibits the use of public resources to “urge any elector to vote for or against any candidate.”

“We’re calling on the state attorney general to begin an immediate investigation into this flagrant abuse of power and violation of the law,” Stephen Handwerk, executive director for the Louisiana Democratic Party, said in a statement. “The state constitution is crystal clear on this point: Jindal broke the law. And he hasn’t even officially started his campaign yet.”

Asked by The Advocate, the governor’s office defended its use of state staff and letterhead to blast Paul’s run for president.

“Matters of national security are very important to Louisianians, and Louisiana is home to many American soldiers.  The suggestion that the governor of Louisiana cannot or should not comment on matters of national security is without merit,” Jindal spokesman Mike Reed said in a statement.

Appearing on MSNBC’s Morning Joe Wednesday, Paul said, “ISIS exists and grew stronger because of the hawks in our party who gave arms indiscriminately, and most these arms were snatched up by ISIS.”

Later in the morning, Jindal, who has formed a presidential exploratory committee as he weighs his own 2016 run, released the statement, which reads in full:

“This is a perfect example of why Senator Paul is unsuited to be Commander-in-Chief. We have men and women in the military who are in the field trying to fight ISIS right now, and Senator Paul is taking the weakest, most liberal Democrat position.

It’s one thing for Senator Paul to take an outlandish position as a Senator at Washington cocktail parties, but being Commander-in-Chief is an entirely different job. We should all be clear that evil and Radical Islam are at fault for the rise of ISIS, and people like President Obama and Hillary Clinton exacerbate it.

American weakness, not American strength, emboldens our enemies. Senator Paul’s illogical argument clouds a situation that should provide pure moral clarity. Islam has a problem. ISIS is its current manifestation. And the next President’s job is to have the discipline and strength to wipe ISIS off the face of the earth. It has become impossible to imagine a President Paul defeating radical Islam and it’s time for the rest of us to say it.”

The Rundown: May 27, 2015

Louisiana Legislature Bobby Jindal The Advocate

Today in The Rundown: Gov. Bobby Jindal goes after President Barack Obama, Mary Landrieu gets a new job, film tax credit changes move forward, and three state sales tax holidays could be suspended.

Welcome to The Rundown, your guide to what’s happening in the Louisiana Legislature and go-to source for news about Louisiana politics and Gov. Bobby Jindal, brought to you by The Advocate.

Get The Rundown in your inbox by filling out the form here.

Countdown…

Countdown…
Days until session ends: 15
Days until the 2015 primary election day: 149
Days until the runoff (as needed): 177

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Bobby Jindal blasts Obama over immigration order

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal took aim at President Barack Obama on Tuesday with a snarky statement just hours after a federal appeals court ruled against removing a temporary hold on his immigration order.

“The Harvard Law School is getting a bad reputation.  It turns out that their most famous graduate has a problem obeying the law,” Jindal said in the statement.

As the Associated Press reports: the U.S. Justice Department had asked the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reverse a Texas judge who agreed to temporarily block the president’s plan in February, after 26 states filed a lawsuit alleging Obama’s action was unconstitutional. Two of the three judges on the court panel voted to deny the government’s request.

“The President’s justification for his latest unlawful gambit was simply that he was tired of waiting for Congress to act.  Apparently, the Court did not find the President being tired to be a compelling reason for him to act in an unlawful manner,” said Jindal, who has frequently taken aim at the president’s November executive action on immigration that would shield millions of immigrant illegally residing in the United States.

Jindal’s recent decision to issue his “Marriage and Conscience Order” — just hours after a House panel killed similar legislation — had some critics noting Jindal’s comments about Obama’s executive actions while issuing his own. Jindal said that the difference was that his order, which seeks to carve out protections for people who oppose same-sex marriage, was needed to uphold the Constitution (Louisiana passed a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage in 2011). He said he views Obama’s as violating the constitution. Jindal said he supports the executive order authority.

Former U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., signs on with DC lobbying firm

Washington — Former U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., has signed on as a consultant with a D.C. law and lobbying firm, the firm announced Tuesday.

Landrieu lost her bid for a fourth term in the Senate last fall to Republican Bill Cassidy. She has owned a home for many years in Washington, where her husband is a real-estate agent.

The lobbying firm, Van Ness Feldman, represents numerous clients in the energy industry, including TransCanada, the company seeking federal approval to complete the long-stalled Keystone XL pipeline from the oil-producing tar sands of Canada to refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast.  Landrieu is a longtime champion of the industry who served as chairwoman of the Senate Energy & Natural Resources Committee for most of 2014. She pushed strongly for a bill to require the White House to issue the necessary permits for the pipeline but failed to win over enough of her fellow Senate Democrats to gain approval of the legislation, which was opposed by environmental groups.

Landrieu, who cannot work as an actual lobbyist until January 2017 under federal rules, joins several other former Louisiana members of Congress in the ranks of Washington’s professional persuaders, including John Breaux, another Democratic ex-senator, and Bob Livingston and Billy Tauzin, bothRepublican ex-congressmen.

Landrieu earlier this spring also accepted a position as a consultant to the Walton Family Foundation, a charitable organization of the family that made its fortune on Wal-Mart stores.